May 6 – 12, 2021

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After the rush of about 44,000 geese last period from April 29 to May 5, migration monitoring has become dominated by songbirds at the Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory. Although the windy and rainy periods around the weekend put a damper on migration activity, since birds spent more time foraging rather than darting directly overhead,… Read more »

April 29 – May 5, 2021

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Birds were counted in the droves at the LSLBO this week. Between recording  26 544 Greater White-fronted Geese, 12 972  Lesser Snow Geese, and 4 339 American Robins, there were also a handful of blackbirds, Tree Swallows, Orange-crowned Warblers, and several sparrow species made a first appearance for the year. Despite so much overhead migration,… Read more »

April 22 – 28, 2021

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Migration is underway, if somewhat slowly because of the cold weather and snow. Yet interesting observations are made daily. The highlight of the week came in the few hours we were able to open the nets and captured a Townsend’s Solitaire – only the fifth time we have banded this species since 1994! Other bird… Read more »

April 17 – 21, 2021

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Beginning in March and wrapping up this week, the Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory completed roadside owl surveys as part of a collaborative project with Strix Environmental Consulting on behalf of West Fraser. These surveys involve driving out to predetermined locations and listening for calling owls, as well as playing recordings of different owl songs,… Read more »

September 24 – 30, 2020

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Pictured: This Brown Creeper was the last bird banded in our Fall Migration Monitoring program, 2020. After a week of high winds and few birds, on September 30 the Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory completed the 2020 Fall Migration Monitoring season. And what a season it’s been! With approximately 3,944 birds banded (Table 1), this… Read more »

September 17 – 23, 2020

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It’s official, Fall Migration Monitoring 2020 has been the busiest for bird banding in the Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory’s 26 years of standardized monitoring. If you recall, this record was recently broken last fall when 3,761 birds were banded. With a week left to go in the fall program, we are already at 3,936… Read more »

September 10 – 16, 2020

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At the Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory, the progression of the seasons is measured not only by the date on the calendar but also by the birds we see around us. As we approach the autumn equinox, Slave Lake is beginning to see an influx of later-migrating birds, among them Myrtle and Orange-crowned Warblers. A… Read more »

September 3 – 9, 2020

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On September 1st, the Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory began its fall owl banding program. While the LSLBO never captures huge numbers of owls, this year had an especially slow start – it wasn’t until September 8th that the first Northern Saw-whet Owl was captured for the year! Pictured: The Northern Saw-whet Owl is one… Read more »

August 27 – September 2, 2020

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By Robyn Perkins, Bander in Charge September brings the beginning of the Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory’s owl migration monitoring program, and with it sleep loss for our banders as they juggle a program that runs nightly (owls) and another that begins at sunrise (songbirds). Concern over our sleep got me wondering how birds sleep… Read more »

August 20 – 26, 2020

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With a few busy days scattered amongst those with poor weather which were predictably slower, this week at the Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory we’ve banded 557 birds, bringing our total for the fall to 2718 of 52 species. Capturing birds involves more finesse than one might expect. The location of the mist-nets is important…. Read more »